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RADAR, NIGHT VISION AND SURVEILLANCE UPDATE

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14 Apr 14. Sagem (Safran) has signed a contract with German manufacturer KMW (Krauss Maffei Wegmann) to integrate its SIGMA 30 navigation and pointing system on all PzH 2000 tracked artillery systems acquired by Qatar. Sagem designed the SIGMA 30 pointing system to give long-range artillery quick, high-precision firing capability without GPS. Because of its performance capabilities, it allows deployments by distributed artillery pieces, boosting mobility and protection by support units. The SIGMA 30 operates independently within the artillery system, protecting it against jamming and other countermeasures. Based on digital laser gyro technology with a long optical path, SIGMA 30 reflects Sagem’s proven expertise in the production of navigation systems and inertial sensors. Its SIGMA 30 navigation/pointing systems are produced in France at the company’s Montlu├žon plant. With this latest contract, Sagem further consolidates its offering of navigation and pointing systems to armies worldwide. SIGMA 30 systems have been selected for some 40 artillery systems in 20 countries, including the Archer system (BAE), the Nexter Systems Caesar, for France and international markets, the Nora wheeled system (SDPR), the M270 Mars 2 single-launch rocket system for NATO (Airbus Defense Systems), and the 2R2M mobile mortar (Thales).
The SIGMA 30 is combat proven. As part of the French army’s Caesar gun, the Sigma 30 has contributed to French artillery units’ effectiveness in some of the most demanding environments on Earth, including Afghanistan and, more recently, in Mali for Operation Serval.

14 Apr 14. Indonesia equips frigates, corvette with stealth radars. Kapitan Pattimura-class corvette. The Indonesian Navy will equip a total of four Ahmad Yani (Van Speijk)-class guided missile frigates and one Kapitan Pattimura (Parchim I)-class corvette with low-probability-of-intercept (LPI) naval radars. The radars will be built by Indonesian naval sensor manufacturer PT Infra RCS, company officials told IHS Jane’s on 11 April. The company describes its equipment, the IRCS LPI Radar, as a stealthy sea-based X-band (SBX) radar with frequency modulated continuous wave technology. “It has a maximum power output of only 10 W, making it quiet and virtually invisible to radar warning receivers on enemy vessels”, said Prihatno Susanto, Technical Advisor for the company. “This allows our warships to detect hostile surface combatants without being discovered”. The IRCS LPI Radar has an effective range of 24 n miles and is equipped with tracking software known as Maritime Tracking Aid that allows for automatic radar plotting aid functionality. The system’s antenna rotates at 20 rpm and has a gain of about 30dB. The radar is available as a stand-alone system but can also be integrated with a vessel’s electronic chart display and information system (IRCS) and combat management system. The vessels now equipped with the radar are the guided missile frigates KRI Ahmad Yani and KRI Abdul Halim Perdanakusuma. Both began upgrade works in December 2013. Undergoing the equipment fixture currently are similar vessels in class KRI Yos Sudarso, KRI Oswald Siahaan and the Kapitan Pattimura-class corvette KRI Sultan Taha. Besides LPI naval radars, the company has also won a contract to equip Oswald Siahaan and Yos Sudarso with naval electronic support measures (ESM) systems that can detect electromagnetic emissions from electronic devices on enemy ships such as radar, communications equipment, jammers and missile targeting systems. “The IRCS ESM has electronic intelligence (ELINT) capabilities that can pick up signals emitted by hostile warships from up to 90 n miles away via a passive radar”, said Susanto. “Once these electromagnetic emissions are detected, a computer software that comes with the system will be able to

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